Humberto Solás and the Low-Budget Film Festival Are in Regla (I)

: Regla, a village well-known for its sanctuary devoted to the worship of Yemayá, and its neighbor Casablanca, are for the first time hosting an international artistic event: the 9th Low-Budget Film Festival.

Rafael Grillo
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2011-04-13

Regla, a village well-known for its sanctuary devoted to the worship of Yemayá, and its neighbor Casablanca, are for the first time hosting an international artistic event: the 9th Low-Budget Film Festival.

This year, the opportunity has come for the community, consisting of nearly 45,000 people and located on the east side of Havana Bay, to animate itself with the charm of cinema, just as occurred in Gibara, in the eastern Cuban province of Holguín, at its inaugural meeting in 2003.

As film critic Rufo Caballero put it, the Gibara Festival is an attitude, a world of values. Seen in this way, the event founded by Humberto Solás is able to survive and take root far beyond any geographic location, because it bets on a kind of cinema that, while lacking resources, is rich in aesthetic and ethical dignity, as well as the social commitment and proximity of its creators to people’s aspirations.

Solás, the originator of the project known as the Low-Budget Film Festival, shot Adela in Regla. And that is exactly where his short film will be shown as part of a retrospective of several programs in the Cine Teatro and in the town’s parks.

The wide-ranging tribute includes projections of Miel para Oshún, Barrio Cuba, documentaries and short films made by the author of Cecilia.

For inhabitants of Regla, there is the most contemporary Cuban cinema, with movies by Tomás Piard, Enrique Pineda Barnet, and a selection of pieces by young filmmakers such as Milena Almira, Armando Capó, Adrián Replanski, and Carlos Lechuga, among others.

A unique opportunity is the presentation of works that are still in the rough cut stage, such as Fábula, by Léster Hamlet; Habana Station, by Ian Padrón; and Marina, the film by Kike Álvarez shot in Gibara.

The overseas presence is led by Last Ball and Contra la corriente, by Peter Callahan (USA); La vida de los peces, by prizewinning Matías Bize (Chile), and El recuento de los daños, by Inés de Oliveira (Argentina).

Standing out are several institutional samples brought from Spain, from the La Boca Erótica and La Boca del Lobo alternative cinema festivals, and from the International Film Festival for Children and Youth.

The Instituto Mexicano de Investigaciones Cinematográficas y Humanísticas and the Parisian Signes de Nuit Festival will also participate in the event.

In Casablanca, other excellent audiovisual offers, which Sergio Benvenuto Solás, the Festival’s director, has qualified as nonconformist and suggestive, will be enjoyed. Thanks to current production and distribution conditions, these offers – fostered by new technologies - are expanding.

*Translated by Adriana Pinelo Avendaño

*Revised by Susana Hurlich

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